Off the Track TB's

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Off the Track TB's

Postby **HocusPocus** » Wed Jul 20, 2005 9:31 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#FONT face=Verdana color=#0000ff#ed_cl#What are your thoughts about buying off the track TB's??#ed_op#/FONT#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby zooka » Wed Jul 20, 2005 10:32 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I've never bought any myself but Ihave friends who have and they have been amazing horses.  Only thing with them was in the field if hacking in groups they can get quite excited!!!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Mystic » Wed Jul 20, 2005 10:44 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#They make great horses for the people who have the time and patience it takes to retrain them. It's not an easy task but it can be done. If you want to know what it's like first hand, pm Cendure, she has an OTTB and can give you some good advice if you decide to go that route.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby chenders01 » Wed Jul 20, 2005 10:54 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I would definitely say that OTTBs are not for beginners.  When they've been trained to race, you have to train that outta them, and that's not something that a beginner can normally do.  #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I had an OTTB.  Mine was 12 when I got him.  I think that he came off the track when he was around 5 or 6, so he had a few years to get some of the "track mentality" out of him, but it was never completely gone.  He was a GREAT horse but he ended up being too much for me (too forward).  I had him for a year and never cantered him.  He'd get really excited and would flip his head and I was always afraid that he'd take off and I'd never get him stopped (unlike non-racehorses, if you pull on a TB, they just go faster).  He was my second horse.  My first was a dead-broke ex-schoolie QH, and the switch to the TB was just more than I could handle.  I sold the TB in May.  #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Having said that, my TB was a wonderful boy!  This horse had been exposed to sooo much while at the track that he rarely spooked.  It had to be something *really* scary before he'd spook.  And his ground manners were great too.  On the ground, he was the mellowist, sweetest horse EVER...and even under saddle, at the trot, he could be downright lazy.  But the canter...it took him awhile to learn that canter was a different gait from gallop LOL!! #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#He was a very sensitive horse, and would pick up on any nervousness that I was feeling.  He also was a very high-energy horse.  He did best when he was ridden every day...if I left him for more than a couple days, he'd be waaay too energetic for me!  #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Anyway, they can be GREAT horses for the right person, but not for beginners or someone who doesn't ride softly.  #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#   #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby flashy_girl » Wed Jul 20, 2005 11:18 am

I think that they a great horse to invest in because they are so athletic they can do almost anything and my sister leases an off the track thoroughbred and she is one of the most kind hearted horses i have met!!!!!! Then my coach also leased an off the track horse that could do amazing in dressage and was jumping well over 3 feet so i do think they are a worth while investment if u are willing to put alot of time into them and give them lots of love!
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Postby Ruth » Wed Jul 20, 2005 11:54 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Like any other "group" of horses some are quiet and easy, others will be more difficult. Some will give you years without soundness issues, others are chronically lame. I used to pretty much ride OTTB's exclusively (and some that were heading back to the track) as a teenager. Most require a sensitive, balanced rider who understands how to stop a horse without hanging onto the reins.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Foxie » Wed Jul 20, 2005 12:29 pm

Ruth wrote:#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Like any other "group" of horses some are quiet and easy, others will be more difficult. Some will give you years without soundness issues, others are chronically lame. I used to pretty much ride OTTB's exclusively (and some that were heading back to the track) as a teenager. Most require a sensitive, balanced rider who understands how to stop a horse without hanging onto the reins.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Completly agree! You can't tug or pull or balance yourself on the reins with a OTTB. In my experience they will just flat out bit down and go. They feel everything. If your nervous, they get fast, your relaxed and soft, they will become the same. The ones that I've ridden...get excited when jumping which means they speed up. Just need to ride every single stride to get them under you. Mind you not all are like this. Some are really lazy.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Since riding a couple of OTTB for the last 4 mths...my riding has become softer, lighter and more balanced. Most important  lesson I've learned??? Absolutely NO tension in your hands or arms when riding them. I love riding them!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#If you know how to train or are going to get an expert  in retraining OTTB's, then I say go for it and buy one. Just make sure that you take someone with you when you go out to look at the horses or go to a reputable place. #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Ruth » Wed Jul 20, 2005 12:33 pm

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#And have a very thorough vet check done.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby **HocusPocus** » Thu Jul 21, 2005 8:59 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Thanks guys for the great thoughts and advise!!  I appreciate it!!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Re: Off the Track TB's

Postby 2dapoint » Thu Jul 21, 2005 9:31 am

**HocusPocus** wrote:#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#FONT face=Verdana color=#0000ff#ed_cl#What are your thoughts about buying off the track TB's??#ed_op#/FONT#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#lol! there is the 64 billion dollar question!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#pros: they've had more exposure to more things than you can ever dream up.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#         They're at least broke - maybe not the same kind of broke that you want, but they   carry weight and steer (most do anyways).  They know how to go, hopefully how to stop.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#they are great for the vet and farrier (usually).  They've learned to load and trailer. Well.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#they know how to ignore the audience and scenery and just do their job.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#They are very seldom whip shy - not that you can flail about with one, but they aren't going to drop you on your head when they notice you have one in your hand.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#They don't have issues with other horses being ridden in close proximity.  They very very rarely kick or bite other horses under tack - you'll save on red ribbons when you go to the showring.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Grooming (of all sorts) is simple!  They don't dance around for braiding or regular stuff either.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#You can pick their feet easily (usually from one side to save all that walking around to the other side)#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Most have vet records that are very finely detailed.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#cons:#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME are more "high octane" than others (like any breed).#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME have some leg issues from repeated use (like any breed, and get a vet check)#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME are broken properly in anticipation of a short racing career.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME are not.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME are heavy mouthed or have learned to really pull.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME have lousy feet - some are even intentionally trimmed in what seems like a "wrong way" to us.  #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME have, indeed, had various drugs in their system (hormones are still drugs) and need to let down#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#MOST have been in a stall 22 hours a day, while on a VERY high - octane diet, as well as being VERY fit!! this often results in a horse that your average hunterjumper rider may be intimidated by.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#FEW have had access to regular turnout - be careful the first few times you do turn out - use a small enclosure first.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Remember, they are, or have been competition horses.  #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Often, they aren't really getting warmed up (in physical or mental conditions) until they are sweated - as most horses would be when you start to cool down.  These are horses who are used to WORK and need it now.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#EXTREME competiveness is NORMAL.  Push them and they are likely to push back - they aren't challenging you or defying you as you might interpret.  But you have to push back.  If you don't, you are "weak" - at it's worst, something to be used as a doormat, at it's best a human who has no clue and isn't going to help the horse when he's looking for a leader#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#SOME play by odd means.  Like you brush their belly, they kick.  In some (as with any horse) this is serious.  In many, it is a mock fight - play.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#MOST love mints.  One of the only treats they can have and no concerns about drug testing.  Some come to love other treats as well... experiment!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#My advice?  Find someone who has retrained extensively and work with them.  Get a vet check (there WILL be issues, you need to know which ones and whether or not you're prepared to deal with them), know that you aren't going to be in the showring in weeks (probably not months either).  Know that you have a horse under you that, when you ask for that little bit extra, will always find more to give.  When the going gets tough - you've got the horse that will get tougher and dig in for you!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl# #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby luvr » Tue Jul 26, 2005 7:16 pm

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#FONT face=Verdana size=2#ed_cl#LOL sounds like the kind of horse I'd love. I can't wait til I can afford my own. I'm going back to lessons (and beginning university) in the fall so I won't be able to get one yet. I'm rusty on some of the things I remember but I always particularly liked the horses with some spunk and lots of energy. Some of the schoolies they had I found kinda boring (but obviously good to learn with - just not my fav type of horse).#ed_op#BR#ed_cl##ed_op#/FONT#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#FONT face=Verdana size=2#ed_cl#My favorite horse (when I was taking lessons) barely listened to anyone and because I was younger my coach dreaded me riding him but let me once in awhile because she knew I loved him. This horse hated cantering and once I tried getting him to canter in an indoor arena and he took off galloping in the arena. After a lap or two I jumped off him (the first thing my coach taught me was how to jump/fall off a horse so I figured there must be a time to use it and went with it). Anyways I didn't get hurt, he was fine and I just got back on and I don't think I tried cantering him again that day (don't remember) but I did canter him after that incident.#ed_op#BR#ed_cl##ed_op#BR#ed_cl#Anyways back to the OTTB. Sounds like a fun horse to have if it's still healthy. Just for future reference (and something else for me to think about), what age do they usually come off the track and what's the average price (if there's even one) and are they usually gelded when they come off (if male obviously). Also, are they usually good for showing in other areas after some training (dressage, H/J, eventing etc.)?#ed_op#/FONT#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Dream_Merchant » Wed Aug 17, 2005 5:29 am

<font face='times new roman' size=2 color=#609A9F><i>
I think this question has been answered a hundred times over -- definately not for beginners, but for those that enjoy retraining a horse into another career, I can tell you from expirence, it is one of the most rewarding things you can do. My current top three Showjumpers are TB's off the track, and they are all really super jumpers -- however it has taken some time to get them there, and I will be the first to admit that having a Warmblood that you've handled from day dot, and trained from day dot to be a jumper, is so much easier than getting a TB already pretrained to gallop his guts out... but as I said, very rewarding, even though very fustrating at times!</i></font>
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Postby Arcadia » Fri Aug 19, 2005 11:17 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I love my boys!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#They have to be reminded occasionally to pull up their big boy pants but for the most part they are curious, friendly and take things in stride.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby *Southwinds* » Tue Sep 13, 2005 3:27 pm

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I have 3 and I love them all! The thing I love about them the most is that they have SO much heart. My current top jumper is an OTTB and doing the 3'9" on the Trillium Circut and has done really well. Like others have said, they are great horses once the track mentality is gone. (my guy still urinates everytime someone steps into the barn) some things will never leave them. I just love them for their big hearts, and really I dont think I would buy anyhting else. #ed_op#IMG src="/richedit/smileys/classic.gif"#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Ruth » Tue Sep 13, 2005 3:35 pm

*Southwinds* wrote:#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#my guy still urinates everytime someone steps into the barn) some things will never leave them. #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#
#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Oh, we had a Clyde X mare that had obviously never seen a racetrack who used to do that.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby TrueColours » Thu Oct 06, 2005 9:42 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Literally 99% of what I own and have ridden in the past are OTTB's and I love them as well. For SO many reasons!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I am a TB "rider" much more than I am a WB rider. I prefer something that is up in front of me more and is more forward in its movement rather than something I need to ask to move forward all the time.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I have sold OTTB's to young riders with limited experience and it has worked out fabulously well with the right supervision.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#Many OTTB's are suited to beginner riders and many are not. Its up to the seller being honest and forthright, the buyer being realistic and the coach being supportive and involved if it is going to work out well for all concerned - the horse included!#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Egyptian Queen » Thu Oct 06, 2005 11:56 am

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#I think it depends mostly on how they were treated and trained at the track.&nbsp; Just like any horse with a good or bad trainer.&nbsp; #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#We had a mare at our place for a winter layup.&nbsp; She was an absolute doll and we even offered to buy her when she was done racing but went on to be a broodmare.&nbsp; She would have made some really nice Anglo-Arabs.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; We have a 19yr old gelding here who is an OTTB.&nbsp; You can definatly tell but from what heard he wasn't treated very well.&nbsp; #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#One of our clients works at a barn that takes in horses from the LongRun group... rehabilitates OTTB hopefully enough to go to good homes.&nbsp; Some of those horses are not very safe and probably never will be.&nbsp; #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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Postby Andy » Thu Oct 06, 2005 12:30 pm

#ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#We lease an OTTB for my son, who just started eventing this year. He was being least to an event barn as a school horse but didn't work out. Like most have stated they are not for beginners. The horse is the easiest horse to handle and generally a big suck but he has to be ridden on a regular basis (mostly everyday). This guy is a 8 year old gelding and a fairly hard keeper. He eats twice as much as any other horse at our place and we have some that are just as big or bigger that he is. #ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#The training part comes easy for him as well although it helps that we have a coach that trains TB for the track as well. He is not an easy loader on the trailer but you never see him get upset. He just will stand there with a look as if "you want me to get on there?".#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#In the cross ties he will stand all day if you let him. Grooming, bathing or picking up his feet is easy but he expects a treat when you are done (bananas of all things is a favorite).#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#All in all this horse is perfect for my son and what his goals are for now.#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl#&nbsp;#ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#DIV#ed_cl##ed_op#/DIV#ed_cl#
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